Summative Entry

In reflection I feel like these blogs have definitely done me some good. Before I began writing them I found it difficult to talk about texts briefly and succinctly, however now I find it much easier. I was also glad at a chance to improve my creative writing as it is an area I feel I should practice in, but rarely do. This unit overall has broadened my writing skills, and allowed me to understand text I otherwise may have discarded. The texts we have studied have benefited me in both writing style and simple understanding of the world around me. I thoroughly enjoyed learning the contexts behind the texts we studied and furthermore being able to better understand the thoughts and feeling of Indigenous people, and Australian writers in general. It has been a journey through history to get to this point, and I am humbled and honoured to have taken it with my fellow students and with Michael and Jess.

Advertisements

Peer Review 7

Response to Joshua

Joshua- I found your ideas regarding the light in the Orange Tree interesting, as regardless of my analysis of it, I never considered there might be a higher meaning to it. I found that my own view of the poem was one quite smiliar to yours however- one of seeing, versus experiencing. I would really have enjoyed to see a bit more about your interpretation of the little girls jouney within the poem!

Dear Miss Slattery

Dear Miss Slattery,

Too often women feel defined by the men in their lives, however yours is a story of empowerment. Your relationship with Tibby unnerved me at times and was never what I considered to be healthy. His intrest was never you as a person, rather he valued you as a pretty object for hs collection. I found your leaving him to be a breath of fresh air on an otherwise suffocating relationship. I wish you all the best on your next endeavour into the world of love. Find somebody who loves who you are more than how you make them feel.

Regards,
Erin

Peer Review 6

Response to Jaye

Jaye- I really enjoyed your description of Syb’s words- they seemed like modern sentiments to me too! Her passion, and in turn his apathy, was (in my view) a very stereotypical representation of relationships between men and women, and a stereotype that has not changed. However I agree with you- I believe that Franklin seeks to portray his characters as people beyond their gender stereotypes and that simple communication is the way to help each character.

Peer Review 5

Response to Tara

Tara- Your description of cicada-song is excellent, and I enjoyed the imagery of them harkening the beginning of summer, as birdsong might announce spring. Personally I found the rhythm of your poem quite jarring, however I enjoyed it as it mimicks the abrupt sound of cicadas chirping. If I were to critique one thing it would be that a few of your rhymes seem quite forced (season, reason) but other than that I’m really enjoyign your writing!

Looking, Seeing, and Experiencing

Discuss the significance of the last line of “The Orange Tree”

There is a great leap between the worlds of looking, seeing, and experiencing. The way in which one simply observes an object can never reach the levels of understanding that one might if they take time to experience every aspect of it without bias or distraction. This is embodied in “The Orange Tree” as the young girl grows ever more frustrated with the older persona who cannot see what she sees in the orange tree. The final stanza is significant within the poem as it establishes both the spiritual experience the young girl is having and the stagnant nature of the personas understanding. Her exclamation of “Silence!” is a break from the previous repetition of “Listen”, and conveys her belief that the man will never undertstand how she feels, as long as he insists on trying to convey it in words. She insists he “wearies” and “plagues” her, detracting from her experience with the Orange Tree. The final line “[I] Am listening like the Orange Tree” changes the tone of the poem, as she trancends the barier between seeing and experiencing herself, going from understanding the light on the Orange Tree, to feeling it and listening to it, as the Orange Tree itself does.

 

Peer Review 4

Response to Kim

Kim- Personally I found the ending of the novel quite pessimistic, however I found it refreshingly real. This being said, after reading your blog I am considering reading it again with your interpratation in mind. Your optmism in Bobby being reunited with Noongar culture as a whole was something I had never considered, as I made the (very western) mistake of thinking of Bobby as an individual, not a part of a whole. I was intrigued by your blog and hope to read more!

Australia – An old country, poluted by a young society

What does A.D. Hope’s poem Australia (written half a century after the 1890s) add to the debate on what is Australia?

A.D. Hope’s “Australia” seems to take the form of a backhanded compliment, in which the beauty of the place is overshadowed by its lack thereof. This is not a new concept, however Hope introduces the idea of Australia as a political being, and as a place of society into the discussion of what makes Australia. When compared to Gilmore and O’Dowd’s poems of the same name, one may note that his criticism of Australia Is rather more scathing and not tinged with love, as the other poems and most creative works regarding Australia are. Despite the fact that he turns “gladly home” he recognises that Australia is an old country with a young society, just trying to survive in this modern world.

My calm, my quiet, my darling

Charles Harpur’s love sonnets to Rosa are a model for all love sonnets. Using the style and structure of a Harpur sonnnet, write a love sonnet to your own beloved! Can you create images as fiery as his?

How would one tell of your sweet embrace?
For no word from this world may adeqautely trace
the lines of your face and the strength of your arms
and how your gentle embrace calms
me when my head is reeling, and my heart is quick
My anxiety, blown out like a candle wick.

How does one describe your charm?
I find myself utterly disarmed.
Taken by your eyes, your manner, your smile;
the simple pleasure I take from admiring your profile.
Your voice is soft like summer breeze
And finally, I am set at ease.